ETERNAL ROCK CONCRETE WARRANTY STATEMENT

 

ONE YEAR LIMITED WORKMANSHIP WARRANTY

At Eternal Rock Construction Inc. all work will be completed in a substantial workmanlike manner according to standard practices. We work very closely with our concrete and material supplier to provide you with the highest quality project. We take great pride in our work and will do everything we can to satisfy you as a customer. However, all of our concrete work is created by humans and even under the closest supervision possible, small imperfections can and will be expected. Despite the skills of our workmanship, the quality of our materials, the strength and durability of concrete, our product is not without its inherent flaws. The information that follows provides some of the common issues that you can expect when working with concrete and provides suggestions on customer care and usage. If we are presented with an issue that exceeds the regular industry standard, we may repair or replace, as determined at the sole discretion of Eternal Rock Construction. Notice is given that all repairs are promised to return the subject to it’s as built integrity – not to its as-built appearance. No warranty is expressed/implied regarding cosmetics of the repair. The subject’s appearance will be considered secondary to it’s long term functionality and durability. 

Concrete can be damaged by many factors beyond ERC’s control. Damage from wear and tear, de-icers, chemicals, equipment, vehicles and other things are out of ERC’s control and are not covered by this Limited Workmanship Warranty. ERC is not liable for repair conditions caused by misuse or abuse, ground settlement, winter conditions, accidents or acts of God.

This warranty does not apply to, and is waived by the homeowner as to, any construction work that has been subjected to an accident, misuse and/or abuse, nor does it apply to any construction work that has been modified, altered, defaced, and/or had repairs made/attempted by the homeowner or others.

This Limited Workmanship Warranty expires one year from the date of completion of the project.

WHAT TO EXPECT:

CRACKS – Concrete WILL crack.  We don’t like it either, but it will happen, so we CANNOT guarantee that concrete will not crack, even in spite of all precautions having been taken.  If a crack appears, we may be able to assist in the prevention of further cracking.  The industry standard for repair or replacement for cracked concrete is greater than 1/4″ of an inch displacement either in height or gap.  Cracks that exceed 1/4″ of an inch in height or gap may warrant repair or replacement.  If we determine that repair or replacement is required, we will replace or repair only the affected area.  Repair of concrete cracks with caulk or mortar will be considered an acceptable form of repair.  PLEASE NOTE: Surface or hairline cracks may not be covered.  Top coats and caps over existing concrete are NOT covered.

FLAKING or POPPING:  While concrete is very durable, it is not always without flaws.  Harsh weather may cause the surface of your concrete to flake or pop off.  It is possible that a stone or stone(s) close to the surface will be exposed but such exposure WILL NOT compromise the integrity of the slab.  We are unable to warranty any damages caused by harsh weather as mother nature always has the upper hand on us.  The industry standard for repair or replacement for flaking or popping concrete is a minimum of 25% of the total work area being affected.  Depending on the issue, we may warranty flaking or popping concrete if 25% or more of the total work area is affected.  If repair or replacement is required, we will repair or replace only the affected area.

DISCOLORATION:  It is NOT possible to match the color of your existing porch, sidewalk, driveway, etc.  Sometimes different pours on larger jobs are subject to variation in color.  Color variations are minor and may fade within time.  If you are considering replacing only a section or sections of an existing driveway, patio or sidewalk, please be aware that a color difference is very likely (newly poured section vs. older section).  It may be very noticeable and may take years to blend together.  Gray Concrete can make no warranty that our work will match your existing product.

Colors represented on a computer screen or a printed brochure are just a representation of results and should not be relied upon for the final color of your project.  Despite our best efforts, minor discoloration can still occur.  There are a variety of different factors (such as: variations in slump, cement type/brand, finished texture, timing of operations, the curing process, choice of release agents, surface treatments, humidity and other weather conditions, age of concrete, etc.) that can and may produce distinct variations in color appearance.  Color variation is not covered by this warranty.

SHIFTING and SETTLING:  It is common for driveways, sidewalks, porches, patios and garage floors to have some cracking or shifting over time.  This is not necessarily a sign of poor workmanship.  There is no way for us to prevent sub-grade settling, underground root growth or shrinkage of the subsurface layers.  We CANNOT warranty against settling because the sub-grade level is beyond our control.

FROST HEAVE and CRACKING:  Throughout any given winter there are many freeze-thaw cycles.  During these events your concrete is likely to heave but will also most likely settle back to its normal elevation again.  However, your concrete is susceptible to cracking during the frost heave event.  Cracking related to frost heave is not a warranty issue.

FINISHESInterior surfaces are generally finished smooth (basement floor, garage, sometimes porches and patios).  A smooth finish allows for easy maintenance.  Please be aware that smooth finishes are VERY slippery when wet.  Exterior concrete such as walks and driveways are broom finished.  A broom finish is less slippery and designed to be walked upon even when wet. Stamped surfaces and stained surfaces are sealed to help maintain the beautiful characteristics of the color and design.  The sealer used will cause a slippery surface when wet.  Please view the information provided below regarding the use and importance of sealers. Additionally, surfaces which are stamped or stained will require maintenance; how frequently is out of our control.

CUSTOMER CARE:

THE DO NOT’S:  1) Do not drive on “new” concrete for at least 7 days.  2) Do not allow water to drain beneath the slab as this may cause settlement cracks.  3) Do not use salt or other de-icing chemicals on the concrete (This is especially harmful during the first winter).  If at all possible, hose off your car of any street salt before parking on concrete. 4) Do not allow your dog’s urine (on your decorative concrete) to cycle through the numerous freeze-thaw cycles during the winter.  Dog urine is extreme acidic and can cause damage to your decorative concrete.  We recommend cleaning it as soon as you witness it.

RE-SEALING DECORATIVE CONCRETE:

It is important to note that we do not warranty sealer related failures.  Surface maintenance is out of our control as heavy traffic, heavy use and severe weather may and can negatively influence the performance of the sealer. The care and maintenance of decorative concrete is the homeowner’s sole responsibility. The frequency with which you should reseal your concrete will depend on the area’s exposure to cars, foot traffic, and any chemicals the decorative concrete is exposed to such as chlorine, salt water, stabilizer and the like.  We highly recommend that stamped concrete projects be kept clean and resealed every other year or as needed. The longer you wait, the more likely you may notice the surface color fade slightly. Keeping a fresh coat of sealer will protect and keep the color as vibrant as the day it was installed. However, keep in mind, too much sealer can cause a host of other problems, the most common is whitening.

THE RESEALING TEST:  To determine if you need to reseal you concrete, sprinkle water on the concrete surface.  If the water is absorbed and makes the surface noticeably darker, the sealer has worn off and resealing the project will restore its original beauty.  If the water is not absorbed and beads on the surface, the concrete should still be protected and likely does not require additional resealing.

You may contact us to discuss a reseal for your concrete or to purchase sealer directly from us.

Eternal Rock Concrete Construction Performance Guidelines

 

Concrete Slabs

Observation: A concrete slab within the structure has separated or moved at control (expansion and contraction) joints.

Performance Guideline:  Concrete slabs within the structure are designed to move at control joints.

Corrective Measure: Because this is a normal occurrence, no corrective action is required by the contractor.

Discussion: Control joints are placed in concrete for the very purpose of encouraging cracking to take place at the joints instead of in random locations.

 

Observation: Efflorescence is present on the surface of the floor.

Performance Guideline:  Efflorescence is the result of dissolved salts being brought to the surface by moisture, then reacting with carbon dioxide to form calcium carbonate that gets left behind on the surface as a dust like material when the migrating water evaporates.  Except for distilled water all water has some salts in it and it takes very little to react in this way, plus concrete has plenty available too.  The potential causes are many, but all involve water.  It can be from naturally high ground water levels, rain early in the curing cycle, sprinklers, subgrades with dissolvable minerals that can form salts, fertilizers in the ground, fertilizers that land on the surface, deicing chemicals, and more.  Wind and low humidity can accelerate the effect when plenty of moisture is available.  The list goes on. Even with applying best practices it is still possible to end up with efflorescence.

Corrective Measure: No corrective action is required by the contractor to meet the performance guideline.

Discussion: Efflorescence is evidenced by the presence of a white film on the surface of the concrete. It is a particularly common occurrence where masonry or concrete are in contact with high moisture levels as may be found in basements.

 

Observation: The concrete floor or slab is uneven.

Performance Guideline:  Except where the floor or portion of the floor has been designed for specific drainage purposes, concrete floors in living areas will not have pits, depressions, or areas of unevenness exceeding 3/8 inch in 32 inches. (See “Taking Measurements” in the Introduction for information on 32-inch levels.)

Corrective Measure: The contractor will correct or repair the floor to meet the performance guideline.

Discussion: A repair can be accomplished by leveling the surface with a material designed to repair uneven concrete.

Remodeling Specific Guideline:  Existing concrete floors or slabs may be uneven. In these situations, no corrective action is required by the contractor.

 

Observation: The concrete floor slab is cracked.

Performance Guideline:  Minor cracks in concrete floor slabs are normal.  Cracks exceeding 1/4 inch in width or 1/4 inch in vertical displacement will be repaired if the slab is in conditioned space or the crack interferes with the installation of finish flooring.

Corrective Measure: The contractor will repair cracks that do not meet the performance guideline using a material designed to fill cracks in concrete.

 

Observation: Interior concrete is pitting or spalling. Pitting is evidenced by concrete that has chipped. Spalling is evidenced by concrete that has flaked or peeled from the outer surface.

Performance Guideline:  Interior concrete surfaces will not pit or spall unless the deterioration is caused by factors outside of the contractor’s control.

Corrective Measure: The contractor will repair concrete surfaces using materials designed for this purpose.

 

Observation: The interior concrete slab has a loose, sandy surface, sometimes referred to as “dusting.”

Performance Guideline:  The surface will not be so sandy that it causes a problem when the finish flooring is applied.

Corrective Measure: The surface will be repaired to be suitable for the finish flooring that the contractor had reason to anticipate would be applied.

 

Poured Concrete Basement, Retaining Walls, Foundation Walls and Crawl Space Walls

Observation: A poured concrete wall is out of plumb.

Performance Guideline:  Finished concrete walls will not be out of plumb greater than 1 inch in 8 feet when measured vertically.

Remodeling Specific Guideline:  If tying into an existing foundation that is out of plumb, the contractor and consumer will review the existing conditions and scope of work. The contractor will make a reasonable and cost-effective effort

to meet the performance guideline while complying with the existing building code.

Corrective Measure: The contractor will repair any deficiencies in excess of the performance guideline. If the wall is to remain unfinished according to contract and the wall meets building codes requirements as evidenced by passed inspections, then no corrective action is required by the contractor.

 

Observation: An exposed concrete wall has pits, surface voids, or similar imperfections in it.

Performance Guideline:  Surface imperfections larger than 3 inch in diameter or 1 inch in depth are considered excessive.

Corrective Measure: The contractor will repair imperfections that do not meet the performance guideline, using a material designed to fill holes in concrete.

Discussion: Pits, surface voids, and similar imperfections are called “air surface voids” and are caused by air trapped between the concrete and concrete form interface. Air surface voids are not structurally significant. The technical term for larger voids is honeycomb. These must be dealt with in accordance with this guideline. The repaired area is unlikely to match the color or texture of the surrounding concrete.

 

Observation: A poured concrete wall is bowed.

Performance Guideline:  Concrete walls will not bow in excess of 1 inch in 8 feet when measured from the base to the top of the wall.

Corrective Measure: The contractor will repair any deficiencies in excess of the performance guideline. If the wall is to remain unfinished according to contract and the wall meets building codes as evidenced by passed inspections, then no corrective action is required by the contractor.

 

Observation: A poured concrete wall is cracked.

Performance Guideline:  Cracks in poured walls will not exceed ¼ inch in width.

Corrective Measure: The contractor will cosmetically repair any cracks to meet the performance guideline, using a material designed to fill cracks in concrete.

Discussion: Shrinkage cracks and other cracks are common and are inherent in the drying process of poured concrete walls. They should be expected in these walls due to the nature of concrete. The only cracks considered under warranty claims are cracks that cause a bow in the wall.

 

Observation: A cold joint is visible on exposed poured concrete foundation walls.

Performance Guideline:  A cold joint is a visible joint that indicates where the pour terminated and continued. Cold joints are normal and should be expected to be visible. Cold joints should not be an actual separation or a crack that exceeds 1/4 inch in width.

Corrective Measure: The contractor will cosmetically repair any cold joint to meet the performance guideline, using a material designed to fill cracks in concrete.

 

Observation: Efflorescence is present on the surface of the poured concrete basement wall.

Performance Guideline:  If the efflorescence is caused by basement water leakage, (actual flow or accumulation), the contractor will eliminate the leak into the structure.

Corrective Measure: The contractor will repair to meet the performance guideline.

Discussion: Efflorescence is a typical condition caused by moisture reacting with the soluble salts in concrete and forming harmless carbonate compounds. It is evidenced by the presence of a white film on the surface of the concrete. It is a particularly common occurrence where masonry or concrete are in contact with high moisture levels as may be found in basements or crawl spaces.

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